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Minikube and Debian

I just started looking at the Kubernetes documentation and interactive tutorial [1], which incidentally is really good. Everyone who is developing a complex system should look at this to get some ideas for online training. Here are some notes on setting it up on Debian.

Add Kubernetes Apt Repository

deb https://apt.kubernetes.io/ kubernetes-xenial main

First add the above to your apt sources configuration (/etc/apt/sources.list or some file under /etc/apt/sources.list.d) for the kubectl package. Ubuntu Xenial is near enough to Debian/Buster and Debian/Unstable that it should work well for both of them. Then install the GPG key “6A030B21BA07F4FB” for use by apt:

gpg --recv-key 6A030B21BA07F4FB
gpg --list-sigs 6A030B21BA07F4FB
gpg --export 6A030B21BA07F4FB | apt-key add -

The Google key in question is not signed.

Install Packages for the Tutorial

The online training is based on “minikube” which uses libvirt to setup a KVM virtual machine to do stuff. To get this running you need to have a system that is capable of running KVM (IE the BIOS is set to allow hardware virtualisation). It MIGHT work on QEMU software emulation without KVM support (technically it’s possible but it would be slow and require some code to handle that), I didn’t test if it does. Run the following command to install libvirt, kvm, and dnsmasq (which minikube requires) and kubectl on Debian/Buster:

apt install libvirt-clients libvirt-daemon-system qemu-kvm dnsmasq kubectl

For Debian/Unstable run the following command:

apt install libvirt-clients libvirt-daemon-system qemu-system-x86 dnsmasq kubectl

To run libvirt as non-root without needing a password for everything you need to add the user in question to the libvirt group. I recommend running things as non-root whenever possible. In this case entering a password for everything will probably be more pain than you want. The Debian Wiki page about KVM [2] is worth reading.

Install Minikube Test Environment

Here is the documentation for installing Minikube [3]. Basically just download a single executable from the net, put it in your $PATH, and run it. Best to use non-root for that. Also you need at least 3G of temporary storage space in the home directory of the user that runs it.

After installing minikube run “minikube start” which will download container image data and start it up. Then you can run commands like the following to see what it has done.

# get overview of virsh commands
virsh help
# list domains
virsh --connect qemu:///system list
# list block devices a domain uses
virsh --connect qemu:///system domblklist minikube
# show stats on block device usage
virsh --connect qemu:///system domblkstat minikube hda
# list virtual networks
virsh --connect qemu:///system net-list
# list dhcp leases on a virtual network
virsh --connect qemu:///system net-dhcp-leases minikube-net
# list network filters
virsh --connect qemu:///system nwfilter-list
# list real network interfaces
virsh --connect qemu:///system iface-list

Echo Chambers vs Epistemic Bubbles

C Thi Nguyen wrote an interesting article about the difficulty of escaping from Echo Chambers and also mentions Epistemic Bubbles [1].

An Echo Chamber is a group of people who reinforce the same ideas and who often preemptively strike against opposing ideas (for example the right wing denigrating “mainstream media” to prevent their followers from straying from their approved message). An Epistemic Bubble is a group of people who just happen to not have contact with certain different ideas.

When reading that article I wondered about what bubbles I and the people I associate with may be in. One obvious issue is that I have little communication with people who don’t write in English and also little communication with people who are poor. So people who are poor and who can’t write in English (which means significant portions of the population of India and Africa) are out of communication range for me. There are many situations that are claimed to be bubbles such as white people who are claimed to be innocent of racial issues because they only associate with other white people and men in the IT industry who are claimed to be innocent of sexism because they don’t associate with women in the IT industry. But I think they are more of an echo chamber issue, if a white American doesn’t access any of the variety of English language media produced by Afro Americans and realise that there’s a racial problem it’s because they don’t want to see it and deliberately avoid looking at evidence. If a man in the IT industry doesn’t access any of the media produced by women in tech and realise there are problems with sexism then it’s because they don’t want to see it.

When is it OK to Reject a Group?

The Ad Hominem Wikipedia page has a good analysis of different types of Ad Hominem arguments [2]. But the criteria for refuting a point in a debate are very different to the criteria used to determine which sources you should trust when learning about a topic.

For example it’s theoretically possible for someone to be good at computer science while also thinking the world is flat. In a debate about some aspect of computer programming it would be a fallacious Ad Hominem argument to say “you think the Earth is flat therefore you can’t program a computer”. But if you do a Google search for information on computer programming and one of the results is from earthisflat.com then it would probably save time to skip reading that one. If only one person supports an idea then it’s quite likely to be wrong. Good ideas tend to be supported by multiple people and for any good idea you will find a supporter who doesn’t appear to have any ideas that are obviously wrong.

One of the problems we have as a society now is determining the quality of data (ideas, claims about facts, opinions, communication/spam, etc). When humans have to do that it takes time and energy. Shortcuts can make things easier. Some shortcuts I use are that mainstream media articles are usually more reliable than social media posts (even posts by my friends) and that certain media outlets are untrustworthy (like Breitbart). The next step is that anyone who cites a bad site like Breitbart as factual (rather than just an indication of what some extremists believe) is unreliable. For most questions that you might search for on the Internet there is a virtually endless supply of answers, the challenge is not finding an answer but finding a correct answer. So eliminating answers that are unlikely to be correct is an important part of the search.

If someone is citing references to support their argument and they can only cite fringe or extremist sites then I won’t be convinced. Now someone could turn that argument around and claim that a site I reference such as the New York Times is wrong. If I find that my ideas were based on a claim that can only be found on the NYT then I will reconsider the issue. While I think that the NYT is generally accurate they are capable of making mistakes and if they are the sole source for claims that go against other claims then I will be hesitant to accept such claims. Newspapers often have exclusive articles based on their own research, but such articles always inspire investigation from other newspapers so other articles appear either supporting or questioning the claims in the exclusive.

Saving Time When Interacting With Members of Echo Chambers

Convincing a member of a cult or echo chamber of anything is not likely. When in discussions with them the focus should be on the audience and on avoiding wasting much time while also not giving them the impression that you agree with them.

A common thing that members of echo chambers say is “I don’t have time to read about that” when you ask if they have read a research paper or a news article. I don’t have time to listen to people who can’t or won’t learn before speaking, there just isn’t any value in that. Also if someone has a list of memes that takes more than 15 minutes to recite then they have obviously got time for reading things, just not reading outside their echo chamber.

Conversations with members of echo chambers seem to be state free. They make a claim and you reject it, but regardless of the logical flaws you point out or the counter evidence you cite they make the same claim again the next time you speak to them. This seems to be evidence supporting the claim that evangelism is not about converting other people but alienating cult members from the wider society [3] (the original Quora text seems unavailable so I’ve linked to a Reddit copy). Pointing out that they had made a claim previously and didn’t address the issues you had with it seems effective, such discussions seem to be more about performance so you want to perform your part quickly and efficiently.

Be aware of false claims about etiquette. It’s generally regarded as polite not to disagree much with someone who invites you to your home or who has done some favour for you, but that is no reason for tolerating an unwanted lecture about their echo chamber. Anyone who tries to create a situation where it seems rude of you not to listen to them saying things that they know will offend you is being rude, much ruder than telling them you are sick of it.

Look for specific claims that can be disproven easily. The claim that the “Roman Salute” is different from the “Hitler Salute” is one example that is easy to disprove. Then they have to deal with the issue of their echo chamber being wrong about something.

More EVM

This is another post about EVM/IMA which has it’s main purpose providing useful web search results for problems. However if reading it on a planet feed inspires someone to play with EVM/IMA then that’s good too, it’s interesting technology.

When using EVM/IMA in the Linux kernel if dmesg has errors like “op=appraise_data cause=missing-HMAC” the “missing-HMAC” means that the error code in the kernel source is INTEGRITY_NOLABEL which has a comment “No security.evm xattr“. You can check for the xattr on a file with the following command (this example has the security.evm xattr):

# getfattr -d -m - /etc/fstab 
getfattr: Removing leading '/' from absolute path names
# file: etc/fstab
security.evm=0sAwICqGOsfwCAvgE9y9OP74QxJ/I+3eOSF2n2dM51St98z/7LYHFd9rfGTvssvhTSYL9G8cTdRAH8ozggJu7VCzggW1REoTjnLcPeuMJsrMbW3DwVrB6ldDmJzyenLMjnIHmRDDeK309aRbLVn2ueJZ07aMDcSr+sxhOOAQ/GIW4SW8L1AKpKn4g=
security.ima=0sAT+Eivfxl+7FYI+Hr9K4sE6IieZ+
security.selinux="system_u:object_r:etc_t:s0"

If dmesg has errors like “op=appraise_data cause=invalid-HMAC” the “invalid-HMAC” means that the error code in the kernel source is INTEGRITY_FAIL which has a comment “Invalid HMAC/signature“.

These errors are from the evm_verifyxattr() function in Linux kernel 5.11.14.

The error “evm: HMAC key is not set” means that the evm key is not initialised, this means the key needs to be loaded into the kernel and EVM is initialised by the command “echo 1 > /sys/kernel/security/evm” (or possibly some equivalent from a utility like evmctl). When the key is loaded the kernel gives the message “evm: key initialized” and after that /sys/kernel/security/evm is read-only. If there is something wrong with the key the kernel gives the message “evm: key initialization failed“, it seems that the way to determine if your key is good is to try writing 1 to /sys/kernel/security/evm and see what happens. After that the command “cat /sys/kernel/security/evm” should return “3”.

The Gentoo wiki has good documentation on how to create and load the keys which has to be done before initialising EVM [1]. I’ll write more about that in another post.

DNS, Lots of IPs, and Postal

I decided to start work on repeating the tests for my 2006 OSDC paper on Benchmarking Mail Relays [1] and discover how the last 15 years of hardware developments have changed things. There have been software changes in that time too, but nothing that compares with going from single core 32bit systems with less than 1G of RAM and 60G IDE disks to multi-core 64bit systems with 128G of RAM and SSDs. As an aside the hardware I used in 2006 wasn’t cutting edge and the hardware I’m using now isn’t either. In both cases it’s systems I bought second hand for under $1000. Pedants can think of this as comparing 2004 and 2018 hardware.

BIND

I decided to make some changes to reflect the increased hardware capacity and use 2560 domains and IP addresses, which gave the following errors as well as a startup time of a minute on a system with two E5-2620 CPUs.

May  2 16:38:37 server named[7372]: listening on IPv4 interface lo, 127.0.0.1#53
May  2 16:38:37 server named[7372]: listening on IPv4 interface eno4, 10.0.2.45#53
May  2 16:38:37 server named[7372]: listening on IPv4 interface eno4, 10.0.40.1#53
May  2 16:38:37 server named[7372]: listening on IPv4 interface eno4, 10.0.40.2#53
May  2 16:38:37 server named[7372]: listening on IPv4 interface eno4, 10.0.40.3#53
[...]
May  2 16:39:33 server named[7372]: listening on IPv4 interface eno4, 10.0.47.0#53
May  2 16:39:33 server named[7372]: listening on IPv4 interface eno4, 10.0.48.0#53
May  2 16:39:33 server named[7372]: listening on IPv4 interface eno4, 10.0.49.0#53
May  2 16:39:33 server named[7372]: listening on IPv6 interface lo, ::1#53
[...]
May  2 16:39:36 server named[7372]: zone localhost/IN: loaded serial 2
May  2 16:39:36 server named[7372]: all zones loaded
May  2 16:39:36 server named[7372]: running
May  2 16:39:36 server named[7372]: socket: file descriptor exceeds limit (123273/21000)
May  2 16:39:36 server named[7372]: managed-keys-zone: Unable to fetch DNSKEY set '.': not enough free resources
May  2 16:39:36 server named[7372]: socket: file descriptor exceeds limit (123273/21000)

The first thing I noticed is that a default configuration of BIND with 2560 local IPs (when just running in the default recursive mode) takes a minute to start and needed to open over 100,000 file handles. BIND also had some errors in that configuration which led to it not accepting shutdown requests. I filed Debian bug report #987927 [2] about this. One way of dealing with the errors in this situation on Debian is to edit /etc/default/named and put in the following line to allow BIND to access to many file handles:

OPTIONS="-u bind -S 150000"

But the best thing to do for BIND when there are many IP addresses that aren’t going to be used for DNS service is to put a directive like the following in the BIND configuration to specify the IP address or addresses that are used for the DNS service:

listen-on { 10.0.2.45; };

I have just added the listen-on and listen-on-v6 directives to one of my servers with about a dozen IP addresses. While 2560 IP addresses is an unusual corner case it’s not uncommon to have dozens of addresses on one system.

dig

When doing tests of Postfix for relaying mail I noticed that mail was being deferred with DNS problems (error was “Host or domain name not found. Name service error for name=a838.example.com type=MX: Host not found, try again“. I tested the DNS lookups with dig which failed with errors like the following:

dig -t mx a704.example.com
socket.c:1740: internal_send: 10.0.2.45#53: Invalid argument
socket.c:1740: internal_send: 10.0.2.45#53: Invalid argument
socket.c:1740: internal_send: 10.0.2.45#53: Invalid argument

; <<>> DiG 9.16.13-Debian <<>> -t mx a704.example.com
;; global options: +cmd
;; connection timed out; no servers could be reached

Here is a sample of the strace output from tracing dig:

bind(20, {sa_family=AF_INET, sin_port=htons(0), 
sin_addr=inet_addr("0.0.0.0")}, 16) = 0
recvmsg(20, {msg_namelen=128}, 0)       = -1 EAGAIN (Resource temporarily 
unavailable)
write(4, "\24\0\0\0\375\377\377\377", 8) = 8
sendmsg(20, {msg_name={sa_family=AF_INET, sin_port=htons(53), 
sin_addr=inet_addr("10.0.2.45")}, msg_
namelen=16, msg_iov=[{iov_base="86\1 
\0\1\0\0\0\0\0\1\4a704\7example\3com\0\0\17\0\1\0\0)\20\0\0\0\0
\0\0\f\0\n\0\10's\367\265\16bx\354", iov_len=57}], msg_iovlen=1, 
msg_controllen=0, msg_flags=0}, 0) 
= -1 EINVAL (Invalid argument)
write(2, "socket.c:1740: ", 15)         = 15
write(2, "internal_send: 10.0.2.45#53: Invalid argument", 45) = 45
write(2, "\n", 1)                       = 1
futex(0x7f5a80696084, FUTEX_WAIT_PRIVATE, 0, NULL) = 0
futex(0x7f5a80696010, FUTEX_WAKE_PRIVATE, 1) = 0
futex(0x7f5a8069809c, FUTEX_WAKE_PRIVATE, 1) = 1
futex(0x7f5a80698020, FUTEX_WAKE_PRIVATE, 1) = 1
sendmsg(20, {msg_name={sa_family=AF_INET, sin_port=htons(53), 
sin_addr=inet_addr("10.0.2.45")}, msg_namelen=16, msg_iov=[{iov_base="86\1 
\0\1\0\0\0\0\0\1\4a704\7example\3com\0\0\17\0\1\0\0)\20\0\0\0\0\0\0\f\0\n\0\10's\367\265\16bx\354", 
iov_len=57}], msg_iovlen=1, msg_controllen=0, msg_flags=0}, 0) = -1 EINVAL 
(Invalid argument)
write(2, "socket.c:1740: ", 15)         = 15
write(2, "internal_send: 10.0.2.45#53: Invalid argument", 45) = 45
write(2, "\n", 1)

Ubuntu bug #1702726 claims that an insufficient ARP cache was the cause of dig problems [3]. At the time I encountered the dig problems I was seeing lots of kernel error messages “neighbour: arp_cache: neighbor table overflow” which I solved by putting the following in /etc/sysctl.d/mine.conf:

net.ipv4.neigh.default.gc_thresh3 = 4096
net.ipv4.neigh.default.gc_thresh2 = 2048
net.ipv4.neigh.default.gc_thresh1 = 1024

Making that change (and having rebooted because I didn’t need to run the server overnight) didn’t entirely solve the problems. I have seen some DNS errors from Postfix since then but they are less common than before. When they happened I didn’t have that error from dig. At this stage I’m not certain that the ARP change fixed the dig problem although it seems likely (it’s always difficult to be certain that you have solved a race condition instead of made it less common or just accidentally changed something else to conceal it). But it is clearly a good thing to have a large enough ARP cache so the above change is probably the right thing for most people (with the possibility of changing the numbers according to the required scale). Also people having that dig error should probably check their kernel message log, if the ARP cache isn’t the cause then some other kernel networking issue might be related.

Preliminary Results

With Postfix I’m seeing around 24,000 messages relayed per minute with more than 60% CPU time idle. I’m not sure exactly how to count idle time when there are 12 CPU cores and 24 hyper-threads as having only 1 process scheduled for each pair of hyperthreads on a core is very different to having half the CPU cores unused. I ran my script to disable hyper-threads by telling the Linux kernel to disable each processor core that has the same core ID as another, it was buggy and disabled the second CPU altogether (better than finding this out on a production server). Going from 24 hyper-threads of 2 CPUs to 6 non-HT cores of a single CPU didn’t change the thoughput and the idle time went to about 30%, so I have possibly halved the CPU capacity for these tasks by disabling all hyper-threads and one entire CPU which is surprising given that I theoretically reduced the CPU power by 75%. I think my focus now has to be on hyper-threading optimisation.

Since 2006 the performance has gone from ~20 messages per minute on relatively commodity hardware to 24,000 messages per minute on server equipment that is uncommon for home use but which is also within range of home desktop PCs. I think that a typical desktop PC with a similar speed CPU, 32G of RAM and SSD storage would give the same performance. Moore’s Law (that transistor count doubles approximately every 2 years) is often misquoted as having performance double every 2 years. In this case more than 1024* the performance over 15 years means the performance doubling every 18 months. Probably most of that is due to SATA SSDs massively outperforming IDE hard drives but it’s still impressive.

Notes

I’ve been using example.com for test purposes for a long time, but RFC2606 specifies .test, .example, and .invalid as reserved top level domains for such things. On the next iteration I’ll change my scripts to use .test.

My current test setup has a KVM virtual machine running my bhm program to receive mail which is taking between 20% and 50% of a CPU core in my tests so far. While that is happening the kvm process is reported as taking between 60% and 200% of a CPU core, so kvm takes as much as 4* the CPU of the guest due to the virtual networking overhead – even though I’m using the virtio-net-pci driver (the most efficient form of KVM networking for emulating a regular ethernet card). I’ve also seen this in production with a virtual machine running a ToR relay node.

I’ve fixed a bug where Postal would try to send the SMTP quit command after encountering a TCP error which would cause an infinite loop and SEGV.

Links April 2021

Dr Justin Lehmiller’s blog post comparing his official (academic style) and real biographies is interesting [1]. Also the rest of his blog is interesting too, he works at the Kinsey Institute so you know he’s good.

Media Matters has an interesting article on the spread of vaccine misinformation on Instagram [2].

John Goerzen wrote a long post summarising some of the many ways of having a decentralised Internet [3]. One problem he didn’t address is how to choose between them, I could spend months of work to setup a fraction of those services.

Erasmo Acosta wrote an interesting medium article “Could Something as Pedestrian as the Mitochondria Unlock the Mystery of the Great Silence?” [4]. I don’t know enough about biology to determine how plausible this is. But it is a worry, I hope that humans will meet extra-terrestrial intelligences at some future time.

Meredith Haggerty wrote an insightful Medium article about the love vs money aspects of romantic comedies [5]. Changes in viewer demographics would be one factor that makes lead actors in romantic movies significantly less wealthy in recent times.

Informative article about ZIP compression and the history of compression in general [6].

Vice has an insightful article about one way of taking over SMS access of phones without affecting voice call or data access [7]. With this method the victom won’t notice that they are having their sservice interfered with until it’s way too late. They also explain the chain of problems in the US telecommunications industry that led to this. I wonder what’s happening in this regard in other parts of the world.

The clown code of ethics (8 Commandments) is interesting [8].

Sam Hartman wrote an insightful blog post about the problems with RMS and how to deal with him [9]. Also Sam Whitton has an interesting take on this [10]. Another insightful post is by Selam G about RMS long history of bad behavior and the way universities are run [11].

Cory Doctorow wrote an insightful article for Locus about free markets with a focus on DRM on audio books [12]. We need legislative changes to fix this!

Scanning with a MFC-9120CN on Bullseye

I previously wrote about getting a Brother MFC-9120CN multifunction printer/scanner to print on Linux [1]. I had also got it scanning which I didn’t blog about.

found USB scanner (vendor=0x04f9, product=0x021d) at libusb:003:002

I recently upgraded that Linux system to Debian/Testing (which will soon be released as Debian/Bullseye) and scanning broke. The command sane-find-scanner would find the USB connected scanner (with the above output), but “scanimage -L” didn’t.

It turned out that I had to edit /etc/sane.d/dll.d/hplip which had a single uncommented line of “hpaio” and replace that with “brother3” to make SANE load the driver /usr/lib64/sane/libsane-brother3.so from the brscan3 package (which Brother provided from their web site years ago).

I have the following script to do the scanning (which can run as non-root):

#!/bin/bash
set -e
if [ "$1" == "" ]; then
  echo "specify output filename"
  exit 1
fi

TMP=$(mktemp)

scanimage > $TMP
convert $TMP $1
rm $TMP

Final Note

This blog post doesn’t describe everything that needs to be done to setup a scanner, I already had part of it setup from 10 years ago. But for anyone who finds this after having trouble, /etc/sane.d/dll.d is one place you should look for important configuration (especially if sane-find-scanner works and “scanimage -L” fails). Also the Brother drivers are handy to have although I apparently had it working in the past with the hpaio driver from HP (the Brother device emulates a HP device).

HP ML350P Gen8

I’m playing with a HP Proliant ML350P Gen8 server (part num 646676-011). For HP servers “ML” means tower (see the ProLiant Wikipedia page for more details [1]). For HP servers the “generation” indicates how old the server is, Gen8 was announced in 2012 and Gen10 seems to be the current generation.

Debian Packages from HP

wget -O /usr/local/hpePublicKey2048_key1.pub https://downloads.linux.hpe.com/SDR/hpePublicKey2048_key1.pub
echo "# HP RAID" >> /etc/apt/sources.list
echo "deb [signed-by=/usr/local/hpePublicKey2048_key1.pub] http://downloads.linux.hpe.com/SDR/downloads/MCP/Debian/ buster/current non-free" >> /etc/apt/sources.list

The above commands will setup the APT repository for Debian/Buster. See the HP Downloads FAQ [2] for more information about their repositories.

hponcfg

This package contains the hponcfg program that configures ILO (the HP remote management system) from Linux. One noteworthy command is “hponcfg -r” to reset the ILO, something you should do before selling an old system.

ssacli

This package contains the ssacli program to configure storage arrays, here are some examples of how to use it:

# list controllers and show slot numbers
ssacli controller all show
# list arrays on controller identified by slot and give array IDs
ssacli controller slot=0 array all show
# show details of one array
ssacli controller slot=0 array A show
# show all disks on one controller
ssacli controller slot=0 physicaldrive all show
# show config of a controller, this gives RAID level etc
ssacli controller slot=0 show config
# delete array B (you can immediately pull the disks from it)
ssacli controller slot=0 array B delete
# create an array type RAID0 with specified drives, do this with one drive per array for BTRFS/ZFS
ssacli controller slot=0 create type=arrayr0 drives=1I:1:1

When a disk is used in JBOD mode just under 33MB will be used at the end of the disk for the RAID metadata. If you have existing disks with a DOS partition table you can put it in a HP array as a JBOD and it will work with all data intact (GPT partition table is more complicated). When all disks are removed from the server the cooling fans run at high speed, this would be annoying if you wanted to have a diskless workstation or server using only external storage.

ssaducli

This package contains the ssaducli diagnostic utility for storage arrays. The SSD “wear gauge report” doesn’t work for the 2 SSDs I tested it on, maybe it only supports SAS SSDs not SATA SSDs. It doesn’t seem to do anything that I need.

storcli

This package contains both 32bit and 64bit versions of the MegaRAID utility and deletes whichever one doesn’t match the installation in the package postinst, so it fails debsums checks etc. The MegaRAID utility is for a different type of RAID controller to the “Smart Storage Array” (AKA SSA) that the other utilities work with. As an aside it seems that there are multiple types of MegaRAID controller, the management program from the storcli package doesn’t work on a Dell server with MegaRAID. They should have made separate 32bit and 64bit versions of this package.

Recommendations

Here is HP page for downloading firmware updates (including security updates) [3], you have to login first and have a warranty. This is legal but poor service. Dell servers have comparable prices (on the second hand marker) and comparable features but give free firmware updates to everyone. Dell have overall lower quality of Debian packages for supporting utilities, but a wider range of support so generally Dell support seems better in every way. Dell and HP hardware seems of equal quality so overall I think it’s best to buy Dell.

Suggestions for HP

Finding which of the signing keys to use is unreasonably difficult. You should get some HP employees to sign the HP keys used for repositories with their personal keys and then go to LUG meetings and get their personal keys well connected to the web of trust. Then upload the HP keys to the public key repositories. You should also use the same keys for signing all versions of the repositories. Having different keys for the different versions of Debian wastes people’s time.

Please provide firmware for all users, even if they buy systems second hand. It is in your best interests to have systems used long-term and have them run securely. It is not in your best interests to have older HP servers perform badly.

Having all the fans run at maximum speed when power is turned on is a standard server feature. Some servers can throttle the fan when the BIOS is running, it would be nice if HP servers did that. Having ridiculously loud fans until just before GRUB starts is annoying.

IMA/EVM Certificates

I’ve been experimenting with IMA/EVM. Here is the Sourceforge page for the upstream project [1]. The aim of that project is to check hashes and maybe public key signatures on files before performing read/exec type operations on them. It can be used as the next logical step from booting a signed kernel with TPM. I am a long way from getting that sort of thing going, just getting the kernel to boot and load keys is my current challenge and isn’t helped due to the lack of documentation on error messages. This blog post started as a way of documenting the error messages so future people who google errors can get a useful result. I am not trying to document everything, just help people get through some of the first problems.

I am using Debian for my work, but some of this will apply to other distributions (particularly the kernel error messages). The Debian distribution has the ima-evm-utils but no other support for IMA/EVM. To get this going in Debian you need to compile your own kernel with IMA support and then boot it with kernel command-line options to enable IMA, in recent kernels that includes “lsm=integrity” as a mandatory requirement to prevent a kernel Oops after mounting the initrd (there is already a patch to fix this).

If you want to just use IMA (not get involved in development) then a good option would be to use RHEL (here is their documentation) [2] or SUSE (here is their documentation) [3]. Note that both RHEL and SUSE use older kernels so their documentation WILL lead you astray if you try and use the latest kernel.org kernel.

The Debian initrd

I created a script named /etc/initramfs-tools/hooks/keys with the following contents to copy the key(s) from /etc/keys to the initrd where the kernel will load it/them. The kernel configuration determines whether x509_evm.der or x509_ima.der (or maybe both) is loaded. I haven’t yet worked out which key is needed when.

#!/bin/bash

mkdir -p ${DESTDIR}/etc/keys
cp /etc/keys/* ${DESTDIR}/etc/keys

Making the Keys

#!/bin/sh

GENKEY=ima.genkey

cat << __EOF__ >$GENKEY
[ req ]
default_bits = 1024
distinguished_name = req_distinguished_name
prompt = no
string_mask = utf8only
x509_extensions = v3_usr

[ req_distinguished_name ]
O = `hostname`
CN = `whoami` signing key
emailAddress = `whoami`@`hostname`

[ v3_usr ]
basicConstraints=critical,CA:FALSE
#basicConstraints=CA:FALSE
keyUsage=digitalSignature
#keyUsage = nonRepudiation, digitalSignature, keyEncipherment
subjectKeyIdentifier=hash
authorityKeyIdentifier=keyid
#authorityKeyIdentifier=keyid,issuer
__EOF__

openssl req -new -nodes -utf8 -sha1 -days 365 -batch -config $GENKEY \
                -out csr_ima.pem -keyout privkey_ima.pem
openssl x509 -req -in csr_ima.pem -days 365 -extfile $GENKEY -extensions v3_usr \
                -CA ~/kern/linux-5.11.14/certs/signing_key.pem -CAkey ~/kern/linux-5.11.14/certs/signing_key.pem -CAcreateserial \
                -outform DER -out x509_evm.der

To get the below result I used the above script to generate a key, it is the /usr/share/doc/ima-evm-utils/examples/ima-genkey.sh script from the ima-evm-utils package but changed to use the key generated from kernel compilation to sign it. You can copy the files in the certs directory from one kernel build tree to another to have the same certificate and use the same initrd configuration. After generating the key I copied x509_evm.der to /etc/keys on the target host and built the initrd before rebooting.

[    1.050321] integrity: Loading X.509 certificate: /etc/keys/x509_evm.der
[    1.092560] integrity: Loaded X.509 cert 'xev: etbe signing key: 99d4fa9051e2c178017180df5fcc6e5dbd8bb606'

Errors

Here are some of the kernel error messages I received along with my best interpretation of what they mean.

[ 1.062031] integrity: Loading X.509 certificate: /etc/keys/x509_ima.der
[ 1.063689] integrity: Problem loading X.509 certificate -74

Error -74 means -EBADMSG, which means there’s something wrong with the certificate file. I have got that from /etc/keys/x509_ima.der not being in der format and I have got it from a der file that contained a key pair that wasn’t signed.

[    1.049170] integrity: Loading X.509 certificate: /etc/keys/x509_ima.der
[    1.093092] integrity: Problem loading X.509 certificate -126

Error -126 means -ENOKEY, so the key wasn’t in the file or the key wasn’t signed by the kernel signing key.

[    1.074759] integrity: Unable to open file: /etc/keys/x509_evm.der (-2)

Error -2 means -ENOENT, so the file wasn’t found on the initrd. Note that it does NOT look at the root filesystem.

References

Basics of Linux Kernel Debugging

Firstly a disclaimer, I’m not an expert on this and I’m not trying to instruct anyone who is aiming to become an expert. The aim of this blog post is to help someone who has a single kernel issue they want to debug as part of doing something that’s mostly not kernel coding. I welcome comments about the second step to kernel debugging for the benefit of people who need more than this (which might include me next week). Also suggestions for people who can’t use a kvm/qemu debugger would be good.

Below is a command to run qemu with GDB. It should be run from the Linux kernel source directory. You can add other qemu options for a blog device and virtual networking if necessary, but the bug I encountered gave an oops from the initrd so I didn’t need to go further. The “nokaslr” is to avoid address space randomisation which deliberately makes debugging tasks harder (from a certain perspective debugging a kernel and compromising a kernel are fairly similar). Loading the bzImage is fine, gdb can map that to the different file it looks at later on.

qemu-system-x86_64 -kernel arch/x86/boot/bzImage -initrd ../initrd-$KERN_VER -curses -m 2000 -append "root=/dev/vda ro nokaslr" -gdb tcp::1200

The command to run GDB is “gdb vmlinux“, when at the GDB prompt you can run the command “target remote localhost:1200” to connect to the GDB server port 1200. Note that there is nothing special about port 1200, it was given in an example I saw and is as good as any other port. It is important that you run GDB against the “vmlinux” file in the main directory not any of the several stripped and packaged files, GDB can’t handle a bzImage file but that’s OK, it ends up much the same in RAM.

When the “target remote” command is processed the kernel will be suspended by the debugger, if you are looking for a bug early in the boot you may need to be quick about this. Using “qemu-system-x86_64” instead of “kvm” slows things down and can help in that regard. The bug I was hunting happened 1.6 seconds after kernel load with KVM and 7.8 seconds after kernel load with qemu. I am not aware of all the implications of the kvm vs qemu decision on debugging. If your bug is a race condition then trying both would be a good strategy.

After the “target remote” command you can debug the kernel just like any other program.

If you put a breakpoint on print_modules() that will catch the operation of printing an Oops which can be handy.

Yama

I’ve just setup the Yama LSM module on some of my Linux systems. Yama controls ptrace which is the debugging and tracing API for Unix systems. The aim is to prevent a compromised process from using ptrace to compromise other processes and cause more damage. In most cases a process which can ptrace another process which usually means having capability SYS_PTRACE (IE being root) or having the same UID as the target process can interfere with that process in other ways such as modifying it’s configuration and data files. But even so I think it has the potential for making things more difficult for attackers without making the system more difficult to use.

If you put “kernel.yama.ptrace_scope = 1” in sysctl.conf (or write “1” to /proc/sys/kernel/yama/ptrace_scope) then a user process can only trace it’s child processes. This means that “strace -p” and “gdb -p” will fail when run as non-root but apart from that everything else will work. Generally “strace -p” (tracing the system calls of another process) is of most use to the sysadmin who can do it as root. The command “gdb -p” and variants of it are commonly used by developers so yama wouldn’t be a good thing on a system that is primarily used for software development.

Another option is “kernel.yama.ptrace_scope = 3” which means no-one can trace and it can’t be disabled without a reboot. This could be a good option for production servers that have no need for software development. It wouldn’t work well for a small server where the sysadmin needs to debug everything, but when dozens or hundreds of servers have their configuration rolled out via a provisioning tool this would be a good setting to include.

See Documentation/admin-guide/LSM/Yama.rst in the kernel source for the details.

When running with capability SYS_PTRACE (IE root shell) you can ptrace anything else and if necessary disable Yama by writing “0” to /proc/sys/kernel/yama/ptrace_scope .

I am enabling mode 1 on all my systems because I think it will make things harder for attackers while not making things more difficult for me.

Also note that SE Linux restricts SYS_PTRACE and also restricts cross-domain ptrace access, so the combination with Yama makes things extra difficult for an attacker.

Yama is enabled in the Debian kernels by default so it’s very easy to setup for Debian users, just edit /etc/sysctl.d/whatever.conf and it will be enabled on boot.