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SE Linux Things To Do

At the end of my talk on Monday about the status of SE Linux [1] I described some of the things that I want to do with SE Linux in Debian (and general SE Linux stuff). Here is a brief summary of some of them:

One thing I’ve wanted to do for years is to get X Access Controls working in Debian. This means that two X applications could have windows on the same desktop but be unable to communicate with each other by any of the X methods (this includes screen capture and clipboard). It seems that the Fedora people are moving to sandbox processes with Xephyr for X access (see Dan Walsh’s blog post about sandbox -X [2]). But XAce will take a lot of work and time is always an issue.

An ongoing problem with SE Linux (and most security systems) is the difficulty in running applications with minimum privilege. One example of this is utility programs which can be run by multiple programs, if a utility is usually run by a process that is privileged then we probably won’t notice that it requires excess privileges until it’s run in a different context. This is a particular problem when trying to restrict programs that may be run as part of a user session. A common example is programs that open files read-write when they only need to read them, if the program then aborts when it can’t open the file in question then we will have a problem when it’s run from a context that doesn’t grant it write access. To deal with such latent problems I am considering ways of analysing the operation of systems to try and determine which programs request more access than they really need.

During my talk I discussed the possibility of using a shared object to log file open/read/write to find such latent problems. A member of the audience suggested static code analysis which seems useful for some languages but doesn’t seem likely to cover all necessary languages. Of course the benefit of static code analysis is that it will catch operations that the program doesn’t perform in a test environment – error handling is one particularly important corner case in this regard.

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