BTRFS Status June 2015

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The version of btrfs-tools in Debian/Jessie is incapable of creating a filesystem that can be mounted by the kernel in Debian/Wheezy. If you want to use a BTRFS filesystem on Jessie and Wheezy (which isn’t uncommon with removable devices) the only options are to use the Wheezy version of mkfs.btrfs or to use a Jessie kernel on Wheezy. I recently got bitten by this issue when I created a BTRFS filesystem on a removable device with a lot of important data (which is why I wanted metadata duplication and checksums) and had to read it on a server running Wheezy. Fortunately KVM in Wheezy works really well so I created a virtual machine to read the disk. Setting up a new KVM isn’t that difficult, but it’s not something I want to do while a client is anxiously waiting for their data.

BTRFS has been working well for me apart from the Jessie/Wheezy compatability issue (which was an annoyance but didn’t stop me doing what I wanted). I haven’t written a BTRFS status report for a while because everything has been OK and there has been nothing exciting to report.

I regularly get errors from the cron jobs that run a balance supposedly running out of free space. I have the cron jobs due to past problems with BTRFS running out of metadata space. In spite of the jobs often failing the systems keep working so I’m not too worried at the moment. I think this is a bug, but there are many more important bugs.

Linux kernel version 3.19 was the first version to have working support for RAID-5 recovery. This means version 3.19 was the first version to have usable RAID-5 (I think there is no point even having RAID-5 without recovery). It wouldn’t be prudent to trust your important data to a new feature in a filesystem. So at this stage if I needed a very large scratch space then BTRFS RAID-5 might be a viable option but for anything else I wouldn’t use it. BTRFS still has had little performance optimisation, while this doesn’t matter much for SSD and for single-disk filesystems for a RAID-5 of hard drives that would probably hurt a lot. Maybe BTRFS RAID-5 would be good for a scratch array of SSDs. The reports of problems with RAID-5 don’t surprise me at all.

I have a BTRFS RAID-1 filesystem on 2*4TB disks which is giving poor performance on metadata, simple operations like “ls -l” on a directory with ~200 subdirectories takes many seconds to run. I suspect that part of the problem is due to the filesystem being written by cron jobs with files accumulating over more than a year. The “btrfs filesystem” command (see btrfs-filesystem(8)) allows defragmenting files and directory trees, but unfortunately it doesn’t support recursively defragmenting directories but not files. I really wish there was a way to get BTRFS to put all metadata on SSD and all data on hard drives. Sander suggested the following command to defragment directories on the BTRFS mailing list:

find / -xdev -type d -execdir btrfs filesystem defrag -c {} +

Below is the output of “zfs list -t snapshot” on a server I run, it’s often handy to know how much space is used by snapshots, but unfortunately BTRFS has no support for this.

NAME USED AVAIL REFER MOUNTPOINT
hetz0/be0-mail@2015-03-10 2.88G 387G
hetz0/be0-mail@2015-03-11 1.12G 388G
hetz0/be0-mail@2015-03-12 1.11G 388G
hetz0/be0-mail@2015-03-13 1.19G 388G

Hugo pointed out on the BTRFS mailing list that the following command will give the amount of space used for snapshots. $SNAPSHOT is the name of a snapshot and $LASTGEN is the generation number of the previous snapshot you want to compare with.

btrfs subvolume find-new $SNAPSHOT $LASTGEN | awk '{total = total + $7}END{print total}'

One upside of the BTRFS implementation in this regard is that the above btrfs command without being piped through awk shows you the names of files that are being written and the amounts of data written to them. Through casually examining this output I discovered that the most written files in my home directory were under the “.cache” directory (which wasn’t exactly a surprise).

Now I am configuring workstations with a separate subvolume for ~/.cache for the main user. This means that ~/.cache changes don’t get stored in the hourly snapshots and less disk space is used for snapshots.

Conclusion

My observation is that things are going quite well with BTRFS. It’s more than 6 months since I had a noteworthy problem which is pretty good for a filesystem that’s still under active development. But there are still many systems I run which could benefit from the data integrity features of ZFS and BTRFS that don’t have the resources to run ZFS and need more reliability than I can expect from an unattended BTRFS system.

At this time the only servers I run with BTRFS are located within a reasonable drive from my home (not the servers in Germany and the US) and are easily accessible (not the embedded systems). ZFS is working well for some of the servers in Germany. Eventually I’ll probably run ZFS on all the hosted servers in Germany and the US, I expect that will happen before I’m comfortable running BTRFS on such systems. For the embedded systems I will just take the risk of data loss/corruption for the next few years.

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